Setting Your Epic 2017 Mega Goals for Success

The New Year is the time of resolutions and gym memberships we use infrequently at best. We give up sweets, swear off alcohol, and vow to be a little nicer when we’re hangry (I love that hangry doesn’t get flagged for spelling).

According to Chinese astrology, 2017 will be the year of the Rooster come February. Apparently the ideal career for Roosters is restaurant owner. Lucky Roosters!

Apparently I’m best suited to be either a hairdresser or a surgeon—to be fair, this particular site does contradict itself more than once. Otherwise maybe hair transplants would be right up my alley.

What is it you want to change about your business this year?

When it comes to resolutions the most common advice for their stickability is focus. It’s no coincidence this is the exact advice we give regarding logo design and your brand messaging.

Have you ever had conversations with your Grandpa that jumped from the time he got tin soldiers when he was ten to the first time he ate an avocado in a single sentence?

There’s a definite feeling of confusion and concern.

Focus for your brand means sticking to one message and making that one message as clear as possible. Conveying more than one message means risking being heard.

When you make a resolution, it’s really no different. You are making a promise to yourself and your business and if it is divided so will be your success.

But don’t stick with broad general ideas like, “I want my business to be more successful”. Getting specific will make the task at hand more manageable.

Consider breaking down a large goal into baby steps. For instance if you are looking for more fans on Facebook or followers on Instagram figure out how you can turn that into baby bites.

Maybe that means you post five additional photos each week. Down the road maybe you increase that to ten or focus more diligently on commenting and engagement.

The impact on your staff by these goals should also be considered.

Do you remember training at your first job and forgetting half of what they taught you in the first week? It’s too much information to fully process at once. If you really want them to stick to a new practice make those instructions dead clear and focus on one task at a time.

Like it or not, humans are actually terrible multi-taskers. Our brains are not wired that way despite the praise we give to multitasking. What we’ve actually become somewhat decent at is switching.

How good a job can we really do when we simply switch from one job to another often. Sounds like a recipe for disaster and yet we think multitasking is the norm, nay, the holy grail of productivity!

By giving others multiple new goals and tasks all at once we simply will overwhelm them. Maybe they can switch back and forth for a short time but eventually one or none will win out. It literally will be too much to ask and lead to burnout or resentment.

When they were building the pyramids they didn’t do it all at once. They started from the bottom and worked up, brick by brick. Had they employed the multitasking mindset they’d have found a lot of squished folks at the whim of the roof.

Instead they set a large goal comprised of many small ones.

So for your own sanity, and those around you, stick to one goal at a time. Only when you reach your focussed goal should you introduce a new one.

December 29, 2016
Posted on 
Author photo in a circle
Kyle Lincoln

Kyle is a logo crafter, avid reader, and writer. His experience expands across a wide spectrum of clients such as Nandos, Shaw Business, and Destination Canada. Growing up, it didn’t take him long to go from doodles to design. Kyle’s previous work in identities for conferences and events left him longing for something more enduring. He’s got a vested interest in helping businesses thrive and an eye for brand incongruences. In Vancouver he can be found scoping out his client’s location and/or the nearest gelateria and is always up to discuss your project or favourite flavour.

The New Year is the time of resolutions and gym memberships we use infrequently at best. We give up sweets, swear off alcohol, and vow to be a little nicer when we’re hangry (I love that hangry doesn’t get flagged for spelling).

According to Chinese astrology, 2017 will be the year of the Rooster come February. Apparently the ideal career for Roosters is restaurant owner. Lucky Roosters!

Apparently I’m best suited to be either a hairdresser or a surgeon—to be fair, this particular site does contradict itself more than once. Otherwise maybe hair transplants would be right up my alley.

What is it you want to change about your business this year?

When it comes to resolutions the most common advice for their stickability is focus. It’s no coincidence this is the exact advice we give regarding logo design and your brand messaging.

Have you ever had conversations with your Grandpa that jumped from the time he got tin soldiers when he was ten to the first time he ate an avocado in a single sentence?

There’s a definite feeling of confusion and concern.

Focus for your brand means sticking to one message and making that one message as clear as possible. Conveying more than one message means risking being heard.

When you make a resolution, it’s really no different. You are making a promise to yourself and your business and if it is divided so will be your success.

But don’t stick with broad general ideas like, “I want my business to be more successful”. Getting specific will make the task at hand more manageable.

Consider breaking down a large goal into baby steps. For instance if you are looking for more fans on Facebook or followers on Instagram figure out how you can turn that into baby bites.

Maybe that means you post five additional photos each week. Down the road maybe you increase that to ten or focus more diligently on commenting and engagement.

The impact on your staff by these goals should also be considered.

Do you remember training at your first job and forgetting half of what they taught you in the first week? It’s too much information to fully process at once. If you really want them to stick to a new practice make those instructions dead clear and focus on one task at a time.

Like it or not, humans are actually terrible multi-taskers. Our brains are not wired that way despite the praise we give to multitasking. What we’ve actually become somewhat decent at is switching.

How good a job can we really do when we simply switch from one job to another often. Sounds like a recipe for disaster and yet we think multitasking is the norm, nay, the holy grail of productivity!

By giving others multiple new goals and tasks all at once we simply will overwhelm them. Maybe they can switch back and forth for a short time but eventually one or none will win out. It literally will be too much to ask and lead to burnout or resentment.

When they were building the pyramids they didn’t do it all at once. They started from the bottom and worked up, brick by brick. Had they employed the multitasking mindset they’d have found a lot of squished folks at the whim of the roof.

Instead they set a large goal comprised of many small ones.

So for your own sanity, and those around you, stick to one goal at a time. Only when you reach your focussed goal should you introduce a new one.

December 29, 2016
Posted on 
Author photo in a circle
Kyle Lincoln

Kyle is a logo crafter, avid reader, and writer. His experience expands across a wide spectrum of clients such as Nandos, Shaw Business, and Destination Canada. Growing up, it didn’t take him long to go from doodles to design. Kyle’s previous work in identities for conferences and events left him longing for something more enduring. He’s got a vested interest in helping businesses thrive and an eye for brand incongruences. In Vancouver he can be found scoping out his client’s location and/or the nearest gelateria and is always up to discuss your project or favourite flavour.

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