The Hidden Logo Wisdom in Pizza

Pizza is the most indecisive food there is. In a World where the psychological impact of shape is ever more apparent, pizza decides to use all of the shapes. Why, not, right?

Delivery arrives to you in a square box. You open it up to a nice circular round pie. And lastly we cut it down into triangles for the perfect way to spend an evening with a movie.

Shape plays the same enormous role in logo design that it does in our favourite cheesy vice.

Choosing a shape will change how customers feel about your business.

Stack of pizza boxes
The all too familiar pizza box. Why not a trapezoid or parallelogram?

Let’s start with the square. Think about the box (not the soggy bottom ones). It is rigid, and hard. It protects our pizza. We can stack it and it fits in most places easily.

The pizza box shape, i.e. the square, is associated with stability. The straight lines of a square are precise and represent professionalism and strength. There is a perfect balance in a square and with it the feeling of trust is imparted.

I’ve never met a pizza box I didn’t trust yet.

They say that the subconscious associates vertical lines with strength, masculinity, and aggression. While horizontal lines are associated with community, tranquility and calm. With a square you are getting the best of both Worlds.

Taking that square and stretching it vertically or horizontally, you can see you can start to change the balance. A long rectangular pizza is definitely for sharing, where maybe a tall towering one might be intimidating—a Pizzilla if you will.

Full pizza with basil and mozzarella
Can we agree that square pizzas are just wrong?

Let’s talk circles. Once you open up that steaming box of doughy delight you are beckoned by the power of the circle.

Curves in general are associated with more feminine qualities. They are gentle, organic, and approachable.

This makes sense since I’ve never found a cube I’d like to hug. A bean bag chair on the other hand seems to have an allure no one can resist. Are you imagining me stuffing my face with pizza and watching Star Wars in a bean bag yet?

Circles are a great way to communicate community. Like a square, they are in perfect balance and suggest a sense of harmony.

They are one of the most familiar shapes to us. Think that the both the Sun and Moon are circles. Eyes being the window to the soul are circles. Tree rings are circles. We see circles all the time in nature, it makes sense they are one of most familiar and comforting shapes.

Plus, as we mentioned before, pizza is a circle and everyone loves pizza.

Alice of pizza with pepperoni

That brings us to the triangle. The last stop before pizza is no longer considered a shape, really.

The triangle is often associated with science, religion, and law. It may come to no surprise to you then that the triangle is a power symbol. They give us the feeling of strength.

In terms of engineering, that seems logical. The triangle is very structurally sound. The pyramids are giant triangles and they’re still kicking around.

Something to consider is that sharp edges affect us deep in our instinctual brains. Sharp has always meant danger, whether that's a rock, tooth, or knife. This is likely where some of the triangle’s strength comes from—it can be a little intimidating and threatening.

Perhaps that’s what makes eating triangle pizza so satisfying. “Take that, pizza, you don’t scare me!” Or maybe it’s a Highlander situation where we inherit the power of the pizza we eat.

It’s a tough call.

Shapes are a huge part of your logo design. More than words, shapes affect us on a gut level. Which stage of pizza does your business best fit?

January 16, 2017
Posted on 
Author photo in a circle
Kyle Lincoln

Kyle is a logo crafter, avid reader, and writer. His experience expands across a wide spectrum of clients such as Nandos, Shaw Business, and Destination Canada. Growing up, it didn’t take him long to go from doodles to design. Kyle’s previous work in identities for conferences and events left him longing for something more enduring. He’s got a vested interest in helping businesses thrive and an eye for brand incongruences. In Vancouver he can be found scoping out his client’s location and/or the nearest gelateria and is always up to discuss your project or favourite flavour.

Pizza is the most indecisive food there is. In a World where the psychological impact of shape is ever more apparent, pizza decides to use all of the shapes. Why, not, right?

Delivery arrives to you in a square box. You open it up to a nice circular round pie. And lastly we cut it down into triangles for the perfect way to spend an evening with a movie.

Shape plays the same enormous role in logo design that it does in our favourite cheesy vice.

Choosing a shape will change how customers feel about your business.

Stack of pizza boxes
The all too familiar pizza box. Why not a trapezoid or parallelogram?

Let’s start with the square. Think about the box (not the soggy bottom ones). It is rigid, and hard. It protects our pizza. We can stack it and it fits in most places easily.

The pizza box shape, i.e. the square, is associated with stability. The straight lines of a square are precise and represent professionalism and strength. There is a perfect balance in a square and with it the feeling of trust is imparted.

I’ve never met a pizza box I didn’t trust yet.

They say that the subconscious associates vertical lines with strength, masculinity, and aggression. While horizontal lines are associated with community, tranquility and calm. With a square you are getting the best of both Worlds.

Taking that square and stretching it vertically or horizontally, you can see you can start to change the balance. A long rectangular pizza is definitely for sharing, where maybe a tall towering one might be intimidating—a Pizzilla if you will.

Full pizza with basil and mozzarella
Can we agree that square pizzas are just wrong?

Let’s talk circles. Once you open up that steaming box of doughy delight you are beckoned by the power of the circle.

Curves in general are associated with more feminine qualities. They are gentle, organic, and approachable.

This makes sense since I’ve never found a cube I’d like to hug. A bean bag chair on the other hand seems to have an allure no one can resist. Are you imagining me stuffing my face with pizza and watching Star Wars in a bean bag yet?

Circles are a great way to communicate community. Like a square, they are in perfect balance and suggest a sense of harmony.

They are one of the most familiar shapes to us. Think that the both the Sun and Moon are circles. Eyes being the window to the soul are circles. Tree rings are circles. We see circles all the time in nature, it makes sense they are one of most familiar and comforting shapes.

Plus, as we mentioned before, pizza is a circle and everyone loves pizza.

Alice of pizza with pepperoni

That brings us to the triangle. The last stop before pizza is no longer considered a shape, really.

The triangle is often associated with science, religion, and law. It may come to no surprise to you then that the triangle is a power symbol. They give us the feeling of strength.

In terms of engineering, that seems logical. The triangle is very structurally sound. The pyramids are giant triangles and they’re still kicking around.

Something to consider is that sharp edges affect us deep in our instinctual brains. Sharp has always meant danger, whether that's a rock, tooth, or knife. This is likely where some of the triangle’s strength comes from—it can be a little intimidating and threatening.

Perhaps that’s what makes eating triangle pizza so satisfying. “Take that, pizza, you don’t scare me!” Or maybe it’s a Highlander situation where we inherit the power of the pizza we eat.

It’s a tough call.

Shapes are a huge part of your logo design. More than words, shapes affect us on a gut level. Which stage of pizza does your business best fit?

January 16, 2017
Posted on 
Author photo in a circle
Kyle Lincoln

Kyle is a logo crafter, avid reader, and writer. His experience expands across a wide spectrum of clients such as Nandos, Shaw Business, and Destination Canada. Growing up, it didn’t take him long to go from doodles to design. Kyle’s previous work in identities for conferences and events left him longing for something more enduring. He’s got a vested interest in helping businesses thrive and an eye for brand incongruences. In Vancouver he can be found scoping out his client’s location and/or the nearest gelateria and is always up to discuss your project or favourite flavour.

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