The Reason No One is Listening

The logo design process is part of a platform for your entire marketing endeavours. Your logo is more than a sticker that is slapped on at the end.

The biggest challenge we’ve found our clients have is narrowing their target market. They know the product they want to sell but not who they are going to sell it to. Of course we all want monumental success that doesn’t exclude any potential customer. We want them all!

As a start up, the concept of narrowing your focus to a very specific niche can sound counter-intuitive but is imperative. Take a look at some of the big boys: McDonalds, Chipotle or lululemon. It seems their net is cast very far and very wide. There is no one that couldn’t be a potential customer.

But that can’t be further from the truth. If you take a look at the beginnings of any big company, they started with a focus. Even now, they still have this focus and you can feel and see it in their brand. Their voice has a particular resonance that is directed in a specific direction.

When starting out, you need to hone in on this voice and who it speaks to. Ideally you will start selling to these specific people. It won’t take long before others outside of this circle will resonate with your business’ voice.

This is where the logo design process can show holes in your target. As designers we need a crystal clear picture of who we are talking to and attracting to a business. Without this information your logo may as well be a sticker slapped on at the end.

Asking as many possible questions about these people is the only way you are going to know how to talk to them. It all ties together your business sales funnel strategy. A solid target market allows you to piece together your strategic puzzle. The logo and look of your business is an important part of that.

You need the honey to attract the bees. Broccoli won’t do the job just like using jargon your clients don’t understand won’t do you any favours. Everything from head to toe needs to be honed in and tuned to draw a specific customer in.

So while a logo design is ‘just a graphic’, it is also extremely important that it is geared towards attracting your market.

To do this, you will need to start with your customer profile and start researching what brands currently resonate with them. What products do they like and what logos work for these people already? We’re not looking to copy just to scope out trends and themes that work. You may quickly find that certain colours come up frequently or that they have common concerns about similar products.

Know these people to the point where you can predict their likes and dislikes. By doing so, your logo will come much more naturally—more so, you will have a clear idea of what marketing they will respond better to and what features of your product are more important.

You still have doubts about targeting a single type of person.

Just because you are targeting bees doesn’t mean you won’t get bears, wasps, and ants too. They will eventually find you if not just from following the bees.

Take lululemon for example. They have customers that don’t do yoga but found them simply by virtue of following yogis on the street in comfortable threads.

Your logo does not stand alone as a badge tacked on, it, like every part of your business, is an integrated strategy to grab a specific customer base. Who follows that customer base is where the rest of the magic happens.

April 13, 2017
Posted on 
Author photo in a circle
Kyle Lincoln

Kyle is a logo crafter, avid reader, and writer. His experience expands across a wide spectrum of clients such as Nandos, Shaw Business, and Destination Canada. Growing up, it didn’t take him long to go from doodles to design. Kyle’s previous work in identities for conferences and events left him longing for something more enduring. He’s got a vested interest in helping businesses thrive and an eye for brand incongruences. In Vancouver he can be found scoping out his client’s location and/or the nearest gelateria and is always up to discuss your project or favourite flavour.

The logo design process is part of a platform for your entire marketing endeavours. Your logo is more than a sticker that is slapped on at the end.

The biggest challenge we’ve found our clients have is narrowing their target market. They know the product they want to sell but not who they are going to sell it to. Of course we all want monumental success that doesn’t exclude any potential customer. We want them all!

As a start up, the concept of narrowing your focus to a very specific niche can sound counter-intuitive but is imperative. Take a look at some of the big boys: McDonalds, Chipotle or lululemon. It seems their net is cast very far and very wide. There is no one that couldn’t be a potential customer.

But that can’t be further from the truth. If you take a look at the beginnings of any big company, they started with a focus. Even now, they still have this focus and you can feel and see it in their brand. Their voice has a particular resonance that is directed in a specific direction.

When starting out, you need to hone in on this voice and who it speaks to. Ideally you will start selling to these specific people. It won’t take long before others outside of this circle will resonate with your business’ voice.

This is where the logo design process can show holes in your target. As designers we need a crystal clear picture of who we are talking to and attracting to a business. Without this information your logo may as well be a sticker slapped on at the end.

Asking as many possible questions about these people is the only way you are going to know how to talk to them. It all ties together your business sales funnel strategy. A solid target market allows you to piece together your strategic puzzle. The logo and look of your business is an important part of that.

You need the honey to attract the bees. Broccoli won’t do the job just like using jargon your clients don’t understand won’t do you any favours. Everything from head to toe needs to be honed in and tuned to draw a specific customer in.

So while a logo design is ‘just a graphic’, it is also extremely important that it is geared towards attracting your market.

To do this, you will need to start with your customer profile and start researching what brands currently resonate with them. What products do they like and what logos work for these people already? We’re not looking to copy just to scope out trends and themes that work. You may quickly find that certain colours come up frequently or that they have common concerns about similar products.

Know these people to the point where you can predict their likes and dislikes. By doing so, your logo will come much more naturally—more so, you will have a clear idea of what marketing they will respond better to and what features of your product are more important.

You still have doubts about targeting a single type of person.

Just because you are targeting bees doesn’t mean you won’t get bears, wasps, and ants too. They will eventually find you if not just from following the bees.

Take lululemon for example. They have customers that don’t do yoga but found them simply by virtue of following yogis on the street in comfortable threads.

Your logo does not stand alone as a badge tacked on, it, like every part of your business, is an integrated strategy to grab a specific customer base. Who follows that customer base is where the rest of the magic happens.

April 13, 2017
Posted on 
Author photo in a circle
Kyle Lincoln

Kyle is a logo crafter, avid reader, and writer. His experience expands across a wide spectrum of clients such as Nandos, Shaw Business, and Destination Canada. Growing up, it didn’t take him long to go from doodles to design. Kyle’s previous work in identities for conferences and events left him longing for something more enduring. He’s got a vested interest in helping businesses thrive and an eye for brand incongruences. In Vancouver he can be found scoping out his client’s location and/or the nearest gelateria and is always up to discuss your project or favourite flavour.

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